Tag Archive | john newton

Approach My Soul, the Mercy Seat

I blog hop.  Yeah, it can be a real time waster.  But if I submit my web journey to the Lord, and let Him take the mouse :-), there are little treasures, and pearls of grace and mercy, just waiting to be discovered.

Yesterday, I hopped from Miscellanies, to The Gospel Coalition, to Sojourn Music, where this gem of a song was available as a free MP3 download:  “Approach My Soul, the Mercy Seat.”  The hymn was originally written by John Newton, but updated a bit by singer/writer Jamie Barnes.  It’s quickly become a favourite of mine! You can listen from the Music Box, or go HERE for the free download. 

Approach My Soul, the Mercy Seat

Approach my soul, the mercy seat
Where Holy One and helpless meet
There fall before my Judges’ feet
Thy promise is my only plea, O God

Send wings to lift the clutch of sin
You who dwell between the cherubim
From war without and fear within
Relieve the grief from the shoulders of crumbling men

O God—Pour out your mercy to me
My God, Oh what striking love to bleed.

Fashion my heart in your alchemy
With the brass to front the devil’s perjury
And surefire grace my Jesus speaks
I must. I will. I do believe. O Lord.

O God—Pour out your mercy to me
My God, Oh what striking love to bleed. 

I must.  I will.  I do believe.    Thy promise is my only plea!!

Christmas Carols Grace Notes – 3

Today’s Christmas hymn is little known and rarely never sung.  It was written by John Newton, who also penned “Amazing Grace” and countless other beauties.  In this mediation/song, Newton expresses his wonder and sadness at the human apathy towards the Lord’s incarnation.  He rightly claims that our praises should outshine the angels, for Christ came in OUR image, and for OUR redemption!

 

Flesh of our Flesh   

Jesus, who passed the angles by,
Assumed our flesh, to bleed and die;
And still He makes it His abode;
As a man, He fills the throne of God.

Our next of kin, our Brother now,
Is He to whom the angels bow;
They join with us to praise His Name,
But we the nearest interest claim.

But ah! how faint our praises rise!
Sure ’tis the wonder of the skies,
That we, who share His richest love,
So cold and unconcerned should prove.

Oh glorious hour! it comes with speed
When we from sin and darkness freed,
Shall see the God who died for man,
And praise Him more than angels can.      [1]

 

[1]  C.H. Spurgeon, compiler, Our Own Hymn Book, Reprint and 2nd Ed, Pilgrim Publications, Texas, 2002.  Page 66.